Wordless Conversations

When I walked my old trail today, I heard the stranger. Not his words, but in what he left for me to find.

It’s been months since our last wordless chat. We stopped leaving messages after the snow fell and covered all the things that made us communicate. Today,Β I found a coffee mug, a tiny Statue of Liberty and a white rubber bracelet.

I picked up his mug and placed my message inside, dried flowers, a bouquet of last summer’s blossoms filled with seeds.

“Hope is around the corner.”

I grabbed a couple of bigger sticks and weaved them together with flimsy grass until they held in place and shaped a cross. I had no problem pushing it into the soggy, spring ground.

“Easter is not cancelled.”

He had arranged the bracelet, the mug and the statue to leave me a clear directive:

“Pray for New York!”

I sat on the bench. As I listened to a nearby whooping crane and a couple of chatty mallards, I prayed.

Over the past several seasons, we have become more creative and even bolder in the way we communicate. I suppose, speaking hope and truth into each other’s lives doesn’t always have to be in person.

(If you like to read how it all started, click here)

“Lord, help us hear the cry of our neighbor’s heart, even when we can’t be together!”

“For though I am absent in body, yet I am with you in spirit,
rejoicing to see your good order and the firmness of
your faith in Christ.”
Colossians 2:5 (ESV)
~
(Pictures and thoughts, Heidi Viars, 2020)Β 

14 Comments on “Wordless Conversations

  1. That is about the neatest thing I have read in a long time. A conversation with someone who you don’t know, but see value in answering back in such a unique way as you have done too. I will have to visit you site often to see where this goes, this could be a great book. Happy Easter.

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  2. I love that you have a voiceless friend. Two voiceless friends counting me πŸ™‚ It might be Boo Radley πŸ™‚ You are such a good writer, Heidi.

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    • hmmm … Boo Radley? Now I have an interesting visual. … I was out there a couple of days ago. EVERYTHING was gone… except the big cross I stuck in the ground previously … and a painted stone minon. Just can’t figure that one out 🧐 Boo Radley kind of makes sense now 😳

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    • Hey Terri, how are you holding up these days. I hope things are good with you … praying you stay healthy … (Is there anything else I can pray for you?)

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  3. I’d forgotten about your faceless, voiceless friend! I wonder if one day the two of you will “just happen” to meet at that bench?! Meanwhile, your hearts are knit together by prayer–a beautiful bonus-benefit that is sometimes overlooked.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Oh Heidi, I love this so much! Thank you for this reminder of how God encourages our hearts through such “wordless conversations”. As we approach Palm Sunday–the “triumphal entry” of Jesus into Jerusalem–and as we face His betrayal and execution to come, may the hope of His resurrection captivate our hearts. Celebrating His faithful example of loving in mysterious ways with you . . .❀️

    Liked by 1 person

    • I don’t know if you noticed the verse on the bench. “I know all the birds of the hills and all that moves in the field is mine.” Psalm 50:11
      The God of the Universes, the Maker of Everything, came and rode on a donkey to show us the we could approach Him in praise. Then, He took all our iniquities and died for our sins. Then demonstrated, by rising from the dead, that He is God and has power over death.
      Unbelievable … mind boggling … so close to us, and so majestic. Thank you, my dear friend, for always leaving me with encouragement! ❀️

      Liked by 1 person

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